Agenda

Check out the Printable Agenda  and Venue Map.

Thursday, February 2

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Open

More Information TBA

9:00 am – 10:00 am

Opening Keynote - The State of the Edtech Marketplace

 

  • What ten things will educators, parents and students be doing 5-10 years from now that they are not doing now?
  • What needs to happen in the next two years for these predictions to be true?
  • What are the critical actions ed innovators should be taking now?
  • What are likely stumbling blocks and how can they be avoided?
  • What is happening in the marketplace related to ed innovation growth outside the US compared to in the US?
  • What have been surprises in development over the past two years?
  • What can edtech stakeholders do to support the marketplace in the coming years?

tom-approved-headshotTom Vander Ark is author of Getting Smart, Smart Cities, and Smart Parents. He is CEO of Getting Smart, a learning design firm and a partner at Learn Capital an education venture fund. Tom advocates for innovations that customize and motivate learning and extend access. Previously he served as the first Executive Director of Education for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Tom served as a public school superintendent in Washington State and has extensive private sector experience. Tom is Board Chair of Charter Board Partners, Director for 4.0 Schools, Bloomboard, Digital Learning Institute, eduInnovation and Imagination Foundation, and serves on several other non-profit boards.

10:30 am – 11:15 am

Concurrent Sessions
The Promise of Intelligent Adaptive Learning

Room: 310

Moderator: David Dockterman, Chief Architect of Learning Sciences for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Panelists: Bob McCabeVice President for Education and Outreach, Lexia Learning and Rosetta StoneTim Hudson, VP of Learning, DreamboxAl Essa, VP of Research and Data Science, McGrawHill Education

Intelligent Adaptive Learning (IAL) promises to meet the needs of learner variability, increasing student achievement by applying proven learning theory to individual student learning. Students are placed at individual levels of development, proceed at their own pace, experience rewards for learning, and repeat work as needed. Educators are provided with rich formative data so they can create groups or individual conferences to further student growth.

During this session, participants will:

  • Explore how educators are using IAL systems
  • Identify the challenges in selecting and implementing IAL systems
  • Review the research that provides evidence of impact on student achievement
  • Construct a better understanding of the challenges and benefits of IAL
Semi-Final Pitch Competition

Room: 301

Moderator: Liam Pisano, Managing Director, LearnLaunch 
Judges: 
Amit Patel, Partner, Owl Ventures Alan Maguire, Founding Partner, Versari; Michelle Dervan, Principal, Rethink Education, Christopher Mirabile, Managing Director, Launchpad Venture Group

Over 30 early stage companies – representing K-12, higher ed, and continuing ed – will have tried to get to this point. Now, the final group of early stage edtech companies who made the cut after winning at the quarter-final LearnLaunch Pitch Competitions, will compete to pitch in-front of the entire conference on Friday, February 3rd. During these semi-final sessions, judges will narrow it down to the final two companies who will have the chance to become the 2017 LearnLaunch Pitch Competition Winner.

How Will Teacher Preparation Create Educators for the Digital World?

Room: 309

Moderator: Arthur Levine, President of Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
Panelists: Lydia Young, Director, Northeastern University Masters Programs in Education; Scott McCue, Dean, MATCH Education Sposato Graduate School of Education

The Project Tomorrow SpeakUp surveys indicate that in 86% of classrooms, instructional materials are more than 25% digital. Gates Foundation Teachers Know Best surveys indicate 93% regularly use digital materials. Yet, relatively few teachers indicate they received formal training in how to integrate technology.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine what is the state of the art in training teachers in the information age
  • Receive an overview of efforts to incorporate tech in pre-service teacher education
  • Identify the challenges faced by schools of education and how they are facing them
  • Examine the most promising new approaches to educating the teachers of tomorrow
The Evolution of Assessments

Room: 312

Moderator, Tony Siddal, Program Officer, Next Generation Learning Challenges
Panelists: Paul Crockett, CEO, AuthessRenee Foster, President, iReady; Jonathan Vander Els, Executive Director, New Hampshire Learning Initiative

Assessment of student learning is an essential part of education. As educators desire to move away from measuring content knowledge to measuring skills and the ability to apply learning, assessments will change. Formative assessments are increasingly deployed; educators are developing rubrics; and simulations are also being used.  We are advancing assessment beyond machine scored multiple choice approaches, but there are still questions as to what technology is needed and affordable to scale the next generation of assessment as educators move towards mastery-based assessments.  

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine how assessments might evolve in the coming years
  • Review the potential of games and simulations for assessment
  • Explore the experiences of pioneering districts and colleges seeking performance assessments
  • Address how close the approaches are to scaling
Reimagining Education and Employment

Room: 308

Speaker: Brandon Busteed, Executive Director, Education & Workforce Development, Gallup

Research by the Gallup organization indicates that employee engagement is the key to successful organizations. How does this apply to students and educators?  In this provocative talk, Brandon Busteed, Executive Director of Education and Workforce Development at Gallup, will address why there is nothing more important we can do as a nation than build the world’s most effective “educonomy” by seamlessly integrating our educational system, our employers, and our job creators.

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore employee engagement is a key predictor of organizational performance
  • Examine how educator engagement influences school performance
  • Review how student engagement influences student learning
  • Address the gaps between educators and employers
Market Trends in Edtech

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Panelists: Susan Wolford, Managing Director and Head of Technology & Business Services Group, BMO Capital MarketsMatt Greenfield, Managing Partner, Rethink Education

The edtech market has been highly dynamic over the past five years. BMO Capital Markets is a leading analyst of education markets, and the firm has  observed a material shift in the education sector. Rethink Education is a prominent edtech investor,  from “pre-K to gray.”

In this session, participants will:

  • Obtain an overview of the education market, and how edtech fits within it
  • Assess the relative growth rates of the subsegments of the edtech market, including K-12, higher ed, and corporate training- “Pre-K to Gray”
  • Explore the key trends driving the industry
  • Understand trends in firm creation and consolidation

11:30 am – 12:15 pm

Concurrent Sessions
High School of the Future

Room: 310

Moderator: Andrew Joseph, CEO, School by Design

Panelists: Alec Resnick, Director, Powderhouse StudioEric Tucker, Co-Founder, Brooklyn Lab Charter School; William Thomas, Principal, Charlestown High C-Town Tech

Many educators are looking to remake high schools to better engage and educate students for the 21st century. What is the experience with early college high school, with new project based learning schools and other innovative approaches? This panel will bring innovative schools to share their experiences.  

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore the key design drivers of the innovators
  • Examine the time, talent, partnerships and dollars required to establish a super school
  • Identify the key technologies super schools are using
Semi-Final Pitch Competition

Room: 301

Moderator: Claire Wadlington, Managing Director at LLV Capital

Judges: 
Eric Cantor, CEO, New Mountain Learning, David Verrill, Managing Director, Hub Ventures; Martin Keck, Principal, Needham & Company, Brigette Lau, Partner, Social Capital

Over 30 early stage companies – representing K-12, higher ed, and continuing ed – will have tried to get to this point. Now, the final group of early stage edtech companies who made the cut after winning at the quarter-final LearnLaunch Pitch Competitions, will compete to pitch in-front of the entire conference on Friday, February 3rd. During these semi-final sessions, judges will narrow it down to the final two companies who will have the chance to become the 2017 LearnLaunch Pitch Competition Winner.

Edtech and The Evolution of Degree Programs, Learning Methods and Learning

Room: 309

Speaker: Vijay Kumar, Associate Dean and Senior Strategic Advisor for Digital Learning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology  MIT 

MIT has long been a leader in education innovation. Vijay Kumar will report on the progress MIT has experienced with MOOC-based degree programs, training faculty to use the available digital tools, sponsoring new learning methods, and developing new blended programs for residential students.  

In this session, participants will:

  • Absorb the range of approaches that MIT is taking in both higher ed and K-12, including problem-focused and curiosity-driven learning
  • Examine the current promising results and challenges
  • Review funding and incentives that have or are being adopted for faculty and staff to more engaged
The Tech Behind Personalized Learning Platforms

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: Sujata Bhatt, Managing Partner, Innovation, Boston Public Schools

Panelists: Adam Seldow, Head of Education Partnerships, Facebook; Erin Mote, Co-founder & Executive Director, InnovateEDU, Curt Allen, CEO, Agilix

Is the future one of playlists curated based on a student’s mastery? Definitions of personalized learning often include personalized learning plans, student portfolios. A number of companies are offering platforms: Facebook’s Summit Learning, Agilix. What are the pros and cons of the platforms? How do they incorporate your favorite content?

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore the pros and cons of the platforms from early adopters
  • See brief demos of personalized learning platforms my major providers
  • Examine edtech standards that may open the systems to an array of content
Marketplaces and Edtech Go to Market

Room: 312

Moderator: John Richards, Founder and President of Consulting Services, CS4ed

Panelists: Claudia Reuter, Senior Vice President of Labs, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Marketplace; Ryan Lefton, Head of Strategic Partnerships, Amazon Education; Nicole Neal, CEO, Noodle Markets

Curated Open Educational Resources (OERs). Amazon Inspire. Noodle Marketplace. HMH Marketplace. Teachers Pay Teachers. TES. It seems that edtech marketplaces are flourishing. What is driving this phenomenon?

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore whether marketplaces are an answer to the entrepreneur’s question: How do I get distribution?
  • Explore if marketplaces address the educator’s question: How do I find appropriate Curtiss Barnes instructional resources for my context?
  • Dissect what digital learning providers seek to gain from offering a marketplace – new customers for other offerings, information on market needs or developers to expand their offerings
  • Examine a map of edtech marketplaces
What It Really Takes to Build a Diverse and Inclusive Education Company

Room: 303

Moderator: Brian Dixon, Partner, Kapor Capital

Panelists: Raul Gutierrez, CEO, TinyBop; Ana Castro, CEO, Genius Plaza; Jinal Jhaveri, CEO, School Mint, Jess Gartner, CEO, Allovue

Wanting to be a diverse and inclusive company and actually being a diverse and inclusive company are two entirely different things. In this panel, hear from four founders of education companies who are putting in the hard work to bake D&I into their company’s DNA. They’ll candidly share their ups and downs and lessons learned, and leave audience members better equipped to affect change in their own education organizations.

In this session, participants in this session will:

  • Hear from entrepreneurs who have adopted the Founders Commitment how they have implemented it
  • Learn about the challenges they are overcoming
  • Understand how their businesses have changed as a result

12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Lunch and Expo

More Information TBA

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm

Keynote - Will Robots Eat Your Job?

“Software is eating the world.” As artificial intelligence capabilities increase, computers and software are doing more jobs that humans used to do, but they’re also creating new opportunities.  MIT’s Erik Brynjolfsson, the co-author of The Second Machine Age, will address what’s in store for the economy and what it means for students and educators. Given his pioneering work on the combined power of people and machines, he will challenge and inspire the audience

ebrynjolfssonphoto1Erik Brynjolfsson is Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, Professor at MIT Sloan School, and Research Associate at NBER. His research examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity and performance, digital commerce, and intangible assets. At MIT, he teaches courses on the Economics of Information and the Analytics Lab. Author or co-editor of several books including NYTimes best-seller The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies, Brynjolfsson is editor of SSRN’s Information System Network and has served on the editorial boards of numerous academic journals.

2:30 pm – 3:15 pm

Concurrent Sessions
Social Justice, Civic Participation, and Edtech

Room: 310

Moderator: Adam Strom, Director of Scholarship and Innovation, Digital Facing History and Ourselves

Panelists: Kristen Harmeling, Partner, YouGov Louise Dube, Executive Director, iCivics

Districts desire to provide opportunity for students, close achievement gaps, and prepare students to be active, engaged citizens. In the aftermath of a heated election and increased attention on the need for civic education, how can digital technologies help achieve that goal? What are the challenges and opportunities facing the classroom  in  teaching about social justice? How can edtech using digital tools help  tackle the challenges of the 21st century? What are some of the promising practices in the field and how can they be scaled in a way that doesn’t exacerbate the growing  divide in our country?   

During this session, participants will:

  • Examine diverse set of issues that still exist with regard access to technology among communities
  • Explore various ways schools are using edtech to power social justice
  • Discuss opportunities that exist for entrepreneurs to help families, community leaders, local officials and media to access what they need to help their community thrive
Edtech Investors Speak Panel

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: Elizabeth Chou, Partner, New Markets Venture Fund

Panelists:  Daniel Pianko, Managing Director, University Ventures, Brigette Lau, Board Partner, Social Capital, Brian Napack, Senior Advisor, Providence Equity Partners

Entrepreneurs need investment like humans need food. Yet, venture capital is a cyclical business that can be feast or famine. Today’s environment emphasizes showing customer validation as early as possible. The requirements to raise capital from institutional investors are particularly stringent.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine key areas that edtech investors believe warrant investment today
  • Understand how investors weigh educational impact and financial results
  • Identify which business plan components are critical to investors beyond the friends and family round
Hacking Your Education with Credentials: Is It Real?

Room: 308

Moderator: Michael Horn, Co-founder & Distinguished Fellow, Christensen Institute

PanelistsMatt Sigelman, CEO, Burning Glass; Liz Simon, General Counsel, General Assembly, Stephanie Krauss , Senior Policy Fellow, Corporation for a Skilled Workforce

Industries such as information technology, healthcare and manufacturing rely on meaningful micro-credentials to indicate levels of knowledge. Yet, the transfer credit problem indicates that standards are not agreed upon for many areas of study and knowledge within the post-secondary curriculum.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine the efforts of Lumina Foundation and others to create core competency standards at the college level
  • Review existing micro-credentials that do not require a Bachelors of Arts in several industries
  • Examine collaborations between institutions of higher ed and “boot camps” to create meaningful credentials and whether these are mostly alternatives to conventional masters degrees?
Coding, Makerspaces the IoT

Room: 301

Panelists: Sue Cusack, Assistant Professor, Lesley UniversityShay Pokress, Visiting Scholar, Wyss Institute at Harvard University; Brian Jordan, Software Engineer, code.org, Ken Yanhs, Director of Marketing, LEGO Education 

Many schools are devising innovative approaches to bring coding into their curriculums. Makerspaces can bring excitement to the STEM subjects; new robots and languages are engaging teachers and students and introduce coding to student before high school or college. In this session, meet the innovators who are using makerspaces to bring coding, robots, and the internet of things into their schools.  

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore the resources that exist for adding coding instruction in K-12 schools
  • Outline tips and techniques from leading adopters
  • Identify links to specific courses and course material
  • Compare afterschool and in school approaches
Digital Learning Providers on the Market Landscape

Room: 309

Moderator: Brook Colangelo, Executive Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Panelists: George Moore, Chief Technology Officer, Cengage; Curtiss Barnes, Managing Director of Product Management & Design Global Product, Pearson; Stephen Laster, Chief Digital Officer, McGraw Hill Education

Publishers are now digital learning providers. They provide the curriculums, increasingly in a digital format, and often with adaptive learning and assessments. Many are now reporting greater than 50% digital sales, and providing tech platforms for learning. What do they consider their greatest assets for and challenges to growth? Will Open Educational Resources (OERs) erode the value of content? Are they building ecosystems of entrepreneurial companies to support their market approach?  

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore the pace of the market change from physical to digital
  • Identify the most valued digital components  
  • Examine the key challenges to growth as defined by the major digital learning providers
  • Evaluate key changes providers are making to their offerings and go to market strategies
Game-Based Learning

Room: 312

Moderator: Eric Klopfer, Professor & Director of the Education Arcade, MIT

Panelists: Dave McCool, Founder, Chairman & CTO, Muzzy Lane; Victoria Van Voorhis, CEO, Second Avenue Learning, Holly Haddad, educator at Whitman Hanson Regional School

Online games are now a bigger business than movies. Games such as Minecraft have moved into  education and many consumer games are said to develop flow, persistence and other desirable traits.  Game mechanics have enlivened all sorts of learning and are increasingly deployed, and educators are interested in how they can integrate them into classrooms and lessons.   At the same time, great games can be costly to develop and maintain and there are questions regarding which educational games are sustainable businesses.   

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore the selection process of choosing a game to be used in a classroom or lesson  
  • Examine how educators have deployed games
  • Outline what are the key game elements for education
  • Identify what games have shown sustainable business model or are showing great promise in teaching and learning  

3:30 pm – 4:15 pm

Concurrent Sessions
When Social Emotional and Mindset Meets Technology

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: Stefan Kohler, CEO, Kickboard
Panelists: 
Jillian Darwish, President, Mayerson Academy, Ami Shah, CEO, Peekapak, Sara Potler LaHayne, CEO, Move This World, Martin Geoghegan, Principal, John T. Nichols, Jr. Middle School

Do students develop qualities like grit and persistence as they struggle through problems in adaptive learning curricula? Are they more likely to develop these qualities if they are working closer to their zone of proximal development? Does the construct of mastery learning help promote a growth mindset? Some edtech products that promote social-emotional development – regulating emotions, interacting well with peers, resolving disputes, have also recently been brought to market.   

During this session, participants will:

  • Explore the types of digital products that focus on student mindset, grit and persistence
  • Examine how educators have found adaptive curricula to impact student engagement and student mindset
  • Reflect on the roles of human interaction and supportive technology in this realm  
Developing Relationships with Strategic Companies

Room: 312

Panelists: Amit Mathew, President, CramFighter; Steve Shapiro, CEO, AcademicMerit; Richard Keaveny, Training & Professional Learning Specialist, McGraw Hill Education, James O’Hare, Partner, Nelson Mullins 

Many large digital learning provider companies report that smaller players come to them to explore a relationship, but are unable to articulate how a partnership will benefit the strategic. So, once an entrepreneur lands the sought after meeting with a potential strategic partner, they need to know what key points they need to keep in mind, how to get the attention they hoped for or how to move forward if they get stuck.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine how strategic edtech companies evaluate go to market partnerships with smaller companies
  • Address the challenges larger companies face in partnering with entrepreneurs
  • Absorb an example of success and what went into it
Bottom Up or Top Down? Edtech in Colleges and Universities

Room: 301

Panelists: Curtiss Barnes, Managing Director of Product Management & Design Global Product, Pearson; Adam J. Newman, Co-Founder & Managing Partner, Tyton Partners; Alan Wolf, Managing Director Academic Technology Services, Harvard University

Faculty in many universities determine the content and modality of their courses. How do faculty and departmental leaders discover and discern which digital resources work for their courses and students?  Do they rely on peer referrals or university technology groups? When they develop new courses, do they hire external instructional designers? How do they standardize on platforms by department? If they want to make decisions based on student data, how do they proceed? These are the burning questions that faculty and administrators are exploring.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine how several universities are curating and offering instructional software and platforms  to faculty
  • Identify how large universities decide which software will be bought centrally and which is the responsibility of a department or faculty member
  • Review how universities launch major tech-based instructional initiatives
Careers in Edtech

Room: 308

Speaker: Willa Perlman, Founder & Managing Partner, Ligature PartnersElizabeth Garzarelli, Partner, Ligature Partners

Are you a student seeking a job in edtech? A mid-career professional seeking to make a change? A teacher looking to work outside the classroom? This interactive workshop session will be led by two tenured executive recruiters in the edtech space, who will provide “best practice” tips on resumes, LinkedIn profiles, interviewing and presentation strategies, as well as how to build an effective job search action plan. Additionally, perspective on what is currently driving hiring in the edtech space will be examined.
Five lucky workshop participants will have a chance to win a free LinkedIn profile review from Ligature Partners.

Edtech Investment Opportunities Globally

Room: 309

Panelists: Dai Ellis, Co-founder, Nova and Spire (Kepler); Geordie Brackin, Director of Innovation, Bridge International Academies, Julius Juerging, Investment Manager, Holtzbrinck, Vincent Fung, Investment Director, NetDragon

Many countries understand that the level of education of their citizens will drive their overall standard of living and are investing in education. At the same time, more wealth has put private education in the reach of many more people, and they are buying it for their families. How are investors taking advantage of these trends?

In this session, participants will:

  • Identify what are some of fastest growing school operators in Africa, Latin America and Asia
  • Explore the variety of strategies new school operators are employing
  • Address the key challenges to starting and scaling school operations
  • Touch on other investment opportunities to serve these schools
A Field Guide to the Adult Learning Market

Room: 310

Moderator: Amber Laxton, Consulting Team Leader, Entangled Solutions

Panelists: Patti Constantakis, Director, Adult Learning Initiatives, Digital Promise, Ira Sockowitz, CEO, Learning Game Studios, Mary Beth Campbell, Executive Director, SkillWorks

Basic skills that adults need for workforce advancement is an area of education that has historically been underserved by entrepreneurs and investors, in large part because the landscape is unfamiliar. Nevertheless, the time has never been better for entrepreneurs and investors to take a leap into the space. Every venture into adult learning will enjoy untapped market potential as well as the chance to make a real social impact. This panel will demystify the adult education/workforce development market and present practical approaches and advice to entrepreneurs and investors seeking success in this field.

4:45 pm – 5:30 pm

Keynote - What Neuroscience has to say for Education 2.0

Neuroscientists and cognitive scientists are working to uncover more insights on how  humans learn. What key insights emerging from basic science should be incorporated into teaching and learning by educators, and the development of new education products and services by entrepreneurs?   What key questions remain?  Gabrieli will provide both an overview and deep insight into his area of inquiry:  the formation of memory.


gabrieli-largeJohn Gabrieli is
Grover Hermann Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Cognitive Neuroscience at MIT. His goal is to understand the organization of memory, thought, and emotion in the human brain. By combining brain imaging with behavioral tests, he studies the neural basis of these abilities in human subjects. A central theme of Gabrieli’s research is memory in its different forms: the short-term recall that allows us to dial a phone number, our long-term memory of events and places, and the emotional associations that often color our factual memories. Gabrieli studies how memory emerges during childhood. As brain imaging technology improves, it becomes possible to scan children at ever younger ages. This will open the door to many new questions about normal human development as well as developmental disorders such as dyslexia or autism. In fact, Gabrieli will head an ambitious new project to study the origins of dyslexia.

5:30 pm – Onwards

Birds-of-a-Feather Dinner

This event is for CONFERENCE ATTENDEES ONLY.

Keep the conversations going post-conference on Thursday night though “Birds of a Feather” dinners and socials. Choose from a wide variety of topics at local restaurants and bars. Sign up today!

FAQS –

Q1. Who is paying for the dinners/drinks?
A1. Each attendee is responsible to pay for their own purchases. If you’re participating in a dinner, we recommend you bring cash to make splitting the check easier for servers.

Q2. What’s the difference between a dinner and a social?
A2. Dinners will be more intimate sit-down meals with groups up to 8 people. Socials are more casual gatherings at local bars for up to 20 people. Keep an eye out for people with awesome LearnLaunch nametags!

Q3. Who made the reservation?
Q4. Our team at LearnLaunch has made reservations for all dinners to start at 6:15pm (many are under the name Blake). For socials, please look for fellow attendees at the bar.

Q4. There are so many options, how should I chose?
A4. We tried to cover a variety of relevant Edtech themes. We recommend you look at the location and price as each event is at a different local establishment (a few restaurants have mutliple themes). If you’re traveling with a large group, we suggest you split up to network and meet new people! If you have a topic we should add, send us a note at info@learnlaunch.org

Q5. I registered but I changed my mind! What should I do?
A5. Have no fear! You can adjust your reservation at our HelpDesk on Thursday afternoon at the event.

Q6. How do I know I won’t be eating alone?
A6. We will cancel dinner reservations that are fewer than 4 people Thursday afternooon and send a note to register for a different dinner option.

Q7. Why are they called “Birds of a Feather” dinners?
A7. Because birds of a feather flock together!

Friday, February 3

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Open

More Information TBA

8:00 am – 9:00 am

LearnLaunch Accelerator Breakthrough Program Showcase and Featured Speaker

Breakthrough Companies

Stay tuned for LearnLaunch Accelerator’s announcement on Monday, December 19th!

 

Featured Speaker

michael-hansen_31716Michael E. Hansen became CEO of Cengage, a global education and technology company, in September of 2012. Under Michael’s leadership, Cengage has transformed from a print publisher to a company which today is creating some of the most highly rated digital learning products and platforms. In FY 2016, digital unit sales outpaced print textbook sales, a significant milestone for Cengage.

Michael has built a strong reputation for transforming businesses across many media and information sectors.  Prior to joining Cengage, he served as CEO of Elsevier Health Sciences;  President and CEO of Harcourt Assessment; Executive Vice President of Operational Excellence at Bertelsmann and Partner and Co-Chairman of the e-Business and Media Practice at Boston Consulting Group

 

Throughout his career, Michael has built a strong reputation for achieving results through a rapid strategic assessment, relentless focus on measurable execution, and a keen emphasis on cultural change which drives sustainability.  

Mr. Hansen holds a Master of Law degree from the University of Bonn in Germany and an MBA from Columbia University in New York

 

9:00 am – 10:00 am

Keynote - Personalizing K-12

In orderphyllis-locket to help all kids achieve their true academic potential, it’s time to rethink the way we do education – to shift our focus from a one-size-fits-all model to personalized learning, a process as individual as learners themselves. LEAP Innovations is a social enterprise, headquartered in Chicago, dedicated to connecting innovation and education to transform learning for all kids. Ms. Lockett, along with her team, has worked with more than 70 schools across Chicago and leads a national network of organizations that are advancing education innovation. In her keynote, Phyllis will address:

  •         What are the real-life stories of teachers, principals and superintendents on their own paths to personalized learning?
  •         What are the critical bottlenecks to achieving broad, successful adoption of personalized learning?
  •         How do we identify and invest in the most promising edtech solutions to advance personalized learning, and drive the development of what’s missing in the market?
  •         What are the differences between creating new schools based on personalized learning compared to creating change within existing schools?
  •         What real-world advice can be offered to personalized learning leaders and pioneers?

 

10:30 am – 11:15 am

Concurrent Sessions
In-Service Teacher Preparation for a Digital World

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: Grace Magley, Director of Digital Learning, Natick Public Schools

Panelists: Dan Callahan, Training & Professional Learning Specialist, EdCampAlex Grodd, Founder, Better LessonNat Vaughn, Principal, T.A. Blake Middle School, Medfield

According to the Project Tomorrow SpeakUp surveys, close to 60% of principals say that lack of teacher preparation on how to integrate digital content into their instruction is a key barrier to increasing personalized learning. So, leaders are seeking the most effective ways to support in-service teachers, as they transition to more personalized learning enabled by digital technologies.

In this session, participants will:

  • Review promising examples of supporting teachers and schools in the adoption of personalized learning enabled by digital technologies
  • Assess the difference between job-embedded strategies for professional development and other approaches
  • Study the role of teacher cohorts, whether in existing professional learning communities or other groupings
  • Examine approaches to personalizing teacher professional development, both in content and in how credits are earned
Buyer's Hot Seat: What Drives a Decision

Room: 308

Moderator: Leo Brehm, Director of IT and Digital Learning, Northborough & Southborough Public Schools

Panelists: Mark Racine, CIO, Boston Public Schools; Kerry Gallagher, Digital Learning Specialist, St. John’s Prep; Anna Nolin, Assistant Superintendent, Natick Public School

The faculty love your product. What are the next steps to having the school or district decide to buy a site license? What are the concerns of instructional technologists and innovation directors? Come and see how an entrepreneur navigates through the steps of bringing the key constituencies on board.

In this session, participants will:

  • Address the interplay of teacher advocates, instructional technologists, academic leader and chief information officers in making a school purchase decision
  • Examine the key concerns of each of the stakeholders in the decision making process
  • Explore how entrepreneurs can address their issues·  
The Changing Landscape of MOOCs in Higher Ed

Room: 309

Moderator: Paul LeBlanc, President, South New Hampshire University

Panelists: Nina Huntemann, Director of Academics and Research, edX; Chris Gabrieli, Chair, Massachusetts Board of Higher Education; Debbie Cavalier, Senior VP Online Learning and Continuing Education, Berklee College of Music

Although the hectic news coverage of MOOCs has slowed, MOOC providers continue to grow dramatically. EdX, Udacity and Coursera lead the way with more than 30 million global learners combined, millions in revenue. The conversation has shifted from MOOC completion rates to partnerships with corporations looking to use MOOCs as part of training programs, from full bachelor’s programs on MOOCs to micro credentials and use of MOOCs in blended learning at major universities, and from access to “inverted admissions processes” in which students who prove they can do the work are admitted to credentialed programs.

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore how MOOCs have been adopted by corporate trainers
  • Review how MOOCs are being adopted by universities for campus blended learning, as well as for online programs
  • Examine freemium models, as well as revenue models for credentialing, and value added offerings such as professor interaction, student interaction and alumni status and micro-masters programs
Learning Innovation Showcase

Room 312 

The Learning Innovation Showcase uniquely presents the voices of learners and enables diverse groups – educators, entrepreneurs, investors, and policy makers – to see a wide range of edtech tools applied in real learning environments. Our inspiring showcase is an opportunity to learn about innovative programming that personalizes learning for students of all ages through access to effective, cutting-edge edte

Twenty teachers and student teams have stepped forward to showcase emerging models of teaching and learning in Secondary Ed (6th – 12th grade), Higher Ed, and learning programs outside of school.

Note: At last year’s Across Boundaries conference, the “Classroom of the Future” drew hundreds of interested participants. This year, we have renamed the showcase the “Learning Innovations Showcase” in order to attract out of school and post secondary learning innovations. 2016 Classroom of the Future

The Future of Food, Andover High School – Andover, MA
Lead Educator: Shelagh St. Laurent

The AHS Future of Food Computer is a small scale hydroponic garden (soil-less garden = that’s the “food” part) and is maintained by a complex series of computers and sensors (= the “computer” part). The Food Computer represents the next evolution in food production and hydroponics. The system is an enclosed hydroponic system that monitors and controls a short list of variables – like temperature, ph, light, CO, etc. – to drastically increases yield and reduce growing time. The Food Computer uses off-the-shelf, affordable tech tools to create an enhanced growing environment to maximize fresh, local, and healthy food options for people any where in the world, any time of year. Learn more: Augmented Reality Sandbox Video

The Anatomy of the Wired Classroom, Beaver Country Day School – Chestnut Hill, MA
Lead Educator: Yolanda Wilcox González

What does it mean to be a wired classroom? Now into our eighth year of practicing hardwired innovation in a 1:1 environment, we have learned a few things and are excited to share our insights. Our goal is to dissect wired classroom experiences and lay on display good daily rituals, collaborative projects, and final products. In doing so, we will be highlighting practical tools that allow teachers and students to become designers, tips for classroom teachers wherever they may land on the technological spectrum, and concrete examples of how to make technology work for you, for the students, and for the educational process. Learn more: Student’s Timeline Project on Sutori, Teacher’s Assignment Presented on Sutori, Literary Devices Presented on Padlet

In the Middle of Design Thinking, Blake Middle School – Medfield, MA
Lead Educator: Diane Horvath

In the Middle of Design Thinking showcases the quick impact design thinking has already made at Blake Middle School since it’s introduction to the faculty this fall. Teachers are combining the power of 1:1 iPad technologies and Design Thinking to reframe student learning across many content areas. Design Thinking has become the glue or guiding principle for teachers to engage students to collaborate in solving a design challenge. Where, the iPad has been invaluable in offering a variety of mobile tools for students. It provides ways for students to capture and record their process, to collaborate and share their ideas and gain feedback, or to develop a video-pitch of their solution. This combination has resulted in moving towards more student-centered, open-ended learning to explore and possibly solve real-world, authentic problems . This showcase will give you a look into a couple of examples of how design thinking is incorporated into the Makerspace, Ancient Greek History (7Gr Social Studies), and Genius Hour of 8th Grade Science and how you can bring the power of DT to your school too.

Math Music Videos, Chelmsford Public Schools – Chelmsford, MA
Lead Educator: Matthew Beyranevand

One way to increase students’ interest and engagement in mathematics is to create music videos with them. Using popular music as a foundation, students and teachers work collaboratively to create songs to teach concepts as well as inspire kids to love math. As featured on WCVB Chronicle and WBZ Eye on Education, creator Dr. Matthew Beyranevand and 7th grade students will share about the importance of girls taking STEM courses as well as the benefits of having a growth mindset. Learn more: Math with Matthew

Exploring the Student Experience in Online, Competency-Based Higher Ed, College for America at Southern New Hampshire University – Manchester, NH
Lead Educator: Jake DeSchuiteneer

College for America (CfA) at Southern New Hampshire University is a regionally accredited, nonprofit university dedicated to developing low-cost, online, competency-based degrees specifically for its diverse population of working adults. The student experience at CfA is unique—students work at a flexible pace to complete workplace-relevant projects in an online format in order to demonstrate mastery of the competencies in their degree program. Rather than attending courses taught by faculty members, students engage independently with the projects and are well supported by Learning Coaches (who guide students through the learning process) and Reviewers (who review and provide detailed feedback on all project work). This Learning Innovation Showcase, which will be presented by a CfA student and two of CfA’s Curriculum and Assessment Developers (CADs), will demonstrate the online learning experience we have created for all students in our degree programs, including the student-facing dashboard, the project-based curriculum model and how we use technology to facilitate project submission, feedback and communication with Coaches and Reviewers.

The Mathematics Classroom of the Future, Duxbury High School – Duxbury, MA
Lead Educator: Stephanie Iacadoro

We will be showcasing the integration of Project Based Learning in a 1:1 Learning Environment in the Mathematics Curriculum. Projects will include technology, writing, and student choice and include the work of a wide range of courses including College Prep, Honors, and AP courses. In our curriculum, performance assessments that are supported through technology are infused into our curriculum vertically and thus sustainable.

VR – An Educational Game Changer
Hamilton Wenham Regional High School / Miles River Middle School – South Hamilton, MA
Lead Educator: Johanna Wilson

Have you ever wished you could take your students to places beyond the classroom or farther away than a school-day field trip would allow? Maybe to the top of Mt. Everest or perhaps, on an underwater adventure? Using virtual reality in the classroom allows teachers to make real connections that enhance and enrich the content. For students, virtual reality provides a learning experience previously unimaginable. Learn how one school district is using virtual reality in new and unique ways to engage students and break down the classroom walls.

Igniting the Maker Mindset, John F Kennedy School – Somerville, MA
Lead Educator: Lindsey Tosches

The Maker Mindset is alive and well at the John F. Kennedy School! By incorporating the maker-way-of-knowing into our standards based science curriculum, students have the opportunity to expand and apply their knowledge in unique, hands-on ways. Modeling problem solving using the engineering and design process provides the framework for students to test, evaluate, and redesign all aspects of their work. Some of our past projects have included 3D design in TinkerCad, 3D printing, and Stop Motion Animation, as well as other hands-on learning experiences. Our showcase will demonstrate that making does not have to be done separately from science curriculum; making can be a meaningful (and FUN) extension of learning that engages all students through a variety of technologies! Learn More: Kennedy School Makerspace, Grade5STEAM 2016 website, Kennedy Makerspace Instagram

Using Innovative Multimedia Engineering Curriculum in Middle School STEM, Mohawk Trail Regional Middle School -Shelburne Falls, MA
Lead Educator: Lauren Binger

Seventh-graders in Lauren Binger’s STEM classes at Mohawk Trail Regional School (MA) used Through My Window (TMW), an NSF-funded engineering curriculum created by Smith College and Springfield Technical Community College. TMW is a multimedia learning environment designed using cutting-edge learning theory. The curriculum includes three components: a young adult novel called Talk to Me–available as an e-reader, audiobook, and paperback; interactive online learning modules, and offline enrichment activities. Engineering topics such as artificial intelligence and the design cycle are featured. Ms. Binger, several of her students, and TMW developers will share results and experiences.

Greengineering, Newton North High School – Newton, MA
Lead Educator: Adam Peloquin

Greengineering is a design engineering course at Newton North High School in which students are challenged to think outside the box. The Greengineering curriculum offers students opportunities to develop solutions for today and tomorrow that will enable the human species to live in harmony with the planet. From soap to skateboards, students become environmental advocates who follow their passions to create innovative products that offer environmental solutions. With the help of the design process students work through complex projects that teach them about marketing, sales, chemistry, economics, biology, and mechanics. Learn More: Greengineering Website

Mission to Mars, North Reading Middle School – North Reading, MA
Lead Educator: Kathleen Dasho

In this session participants will learn about how students in our after school robot club used STEM concepts to build and program a Mission to Mars simulation using LEGO EV3 robots. They demonstrated their enthusiasm and determination in hands-on problem solving completing the assorted challenges with the robots in activities that promote creative problem-solving, communication and teamwork skills. Students creatively adapted and applied programming and problem-solving skills to make the robots solve challenges related to space exploration, such as programming robots to gather rocks on Mars, rescue stranded astronauts, retrieve a Mars rover, launch a satellite and a communications station. Students worked in groups to solve these problems, and explored the necessary strategies to complete the challenges. The showcase will show the robots in action, as well as a video in the background showing the challenges as if you were on Mars watching this take place. Using laptops with the EV3 software, students programmed, tested robots and completed the challenges. Key goals were having robots autonomously carry out and complete each challenge successfully, as well as working collaboratively with a partner to complete the task. Learn More: Mission to Mars Video

Spark your Teaching with Digital Tools, Northeastern University – Boston, MA
Lead Educator: Nina Araújo

Many factors can play a role in how students engage with various types of information, such as depth and breadth of new content, its organization, and visual design of materials as well as media elements. This is not a one-stop shop environment. It has become crucial for pre-service students in the education department at Northeastern University to access information via multiple entry points to learning. The use of engaging and innovative digital tools provide experiences that promote sustained student engagement, in and out of the classroom, in the cloud, or in their hands through mobile devices. The integration helps students solve problems from a variety of different angles using different technology. This showcase will illustrate to participants what teaching and learning look like within an innovative and integrated digital environment. The key goal of this showcase is to promote student engagement and sustain it over time as a model for future students in k-12 schools. Learn More: Mobile App Assignment

Reflective Learning Mindset: Developing Self-Directed Learners in STEM, St. Mark’s School -Southborough, MA
Lead Educator: Kimberley Berndt

For students to become life-long learners they need to develop the habits of mind requisite for being a reflective learner. This presentation will share the story of how students in a lab-based Biotechnology course experienced the power of personalized learning as they practiced habits and developed skills necessary to truly “own” their learning. A gradual release of responsibility and deliberate scaffolding enabled learners to develop self-efficacy in the lab, learn deeply about science, creatively communicate their learning, and follow their own curiosities.

STEAM Splash, Stormgears FRC – Devens, MA
Lead Educator: William Kazman

STEAM Splash was created by a high-school robotics team in 2014. We came together after being inspired by the 2014 FLL World Championships. It was a life-changing experience for us, but we realized that not everyone has this opportunity. There are many barriers to becoming involved with FIRST and enjoying STEAM, such as money and time commitment from adults. With STEAM Splash Jr. FLL In-a-Box, we greatly lower the barriers of getting children from ages 6-10 involved with team-based showcases that celebrate STEAM education and progress. STEAM Splash Jr. FLL In-a-Box reformats the Jr. FLL season into eight 60-minute activity sessions and is complemented by our STEAM Splash Showcase. The STEAM Splash Showcase is an online platform which contains our entire curriculum as a downloadable PDF. Along with this it allows the kids to display their work and interact with high-school mentors to continue to inspire them.Already we have reached 10,000 kids through over 10 local events and 2 events overseas. We want to spread our passion to the next generation of science and technology leaders using STEAM Splash. Learn More: Stormgears Website

Personalized Learning in Math: Using Technology to Design Custom Math Curricula for Each Student, TechBoston Academy – Boston, MA
Lead Educator: Alia Verner

In our efforts to continue offering our community a world class education that prepares students for success in college, TechBoston Academy added an innovative personalized learning model called Teach to One: Math. Teach to One: Math helps our teachers tailor instruction to the unique learning needs of each scholar at TBA. Each day students receive a customized schedule that indicates what mathematics skill they are ready to learn, the best way for them to learn it, and with which teacher and peers they will work with that day. In Teach to One, students explore math with teachers, collaborating with other scholars on projects, and working with high quality computer software. By meeting each child where they are, we expect our scholars to deepen their understanding and discover the beauty and power of mathematics. Learn More: Teach to One, Teach to One in the Boston Globe, Teach to One on BNN News

Creating Smart Phone Cases Using 3D Printer Technology, Whitman-Hanson Regional High School – Whitman, MA
Lead Educator: Julie Giglia

Students worked in teams of two to complete the design and development of the smartphone case project using 3D printer technology. Students learned and applied the steps in the design process. Students created a project plan that outlined the steps needed from inception to the final cell phone prototype design. It was my job to ensure collaboration with students on the design solution ensuring all steps in the design process are well thought out and completed. Students would have to research target customers’ needs to determine attributes cell phone users want complete 2D and 3D sketches of the prototype and use CAD software called Sketchup. They drew the right dimensional designs to ensure the design prototypes measurements were precise. Teams participated in the design of the cell phone case cover using the CAD software and 3D print final physical cell phone case prototype. This was a learning curve for my students. Often, we had to create many prototypes because the cell phone case ergonomically did not fit the physical cell phone. Students would get frustrated if the case did not fit with their first prototype, it was a learning curve for all involved. Overall, this project enabled my students to learn 3D printer technology. Learn More: 3D Design Challenge Video

Many Stories, One Project: 1:1 Learning and the Multi-Genre Research Project, Wilson Middle School – Natick, MA
Lead Educator: Eric Fries

What are you passionate about? What would you study if you had the choice? Every spring, 8th graders in Natick Public Schools create a “Multi-Genre Research Project” encompassing multiple weeks of research and the creation of several small projects to create a cohesive presentation on a topic of their choice. This process, however, is one they work towards throughout the year through a 1:1 laptop initiative and a variety of project-based learning experiences in many of their classes. In this showcase, 8th grade students will present examples of projects in core content areas that display the sort of individualized learning that builds towards this research project. In addition, a 9th grade student will explain and present the process of choosing a topic they’re passionate about, researching it and creating and end-of-year Multi-Genre Research project on it. Exemplar work from these and other students will be displayed. These projects will show how a 1:1 blended learning environment can foster individualized learning and encourage the sort of inquiry and technical skills that lead to an end-of-Middle School capstone project. Learn More: Wilson Middle School

The ABCs of Instructional Design

Room: 310

Speaker: Bror Saxberg, Chief Learning Officer, Kaplan

As digital learning offerings have grown, so too has the demand for savvy instructional designers.  They must be experts in UI, UX, learning science, content, and project management. Bror Saxberg, the Chief Learning Officer of Kaplan, will show how learning science is applied to creation of effective learning environments, and explore how to become a better “learning engineer” and instructional designer.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine how cognitive science can influence instructional design
  • Identify the critical components of designing a learning experience
  • Explore how continuous refinement can be implemented during instructional design process
Social Impact Investing

Room: 301

Moderator: Sky Lance, General Partner, Sustain VC
Panelists: John Duong, Director of Strategic Social Investments, LuminaShauntel Poulson, General Partner & Co-Founder, Reach Capital; Nasir Quadree, Economic Opportunity Lead, Village Capital

Impact investing is a growing source of capital,  and edtech is one of its focus areas.   With many financial investors focusing on existing portfolio companies, many  hope that this  will expand the pool of capital available to edtech entrepreneurs, while others wonder if it will increase competition and raise the valuations of edtech firms.

In this session, participants will:

  • Assess social impact investing trends
  • Explore what motivates social impact investors and how they measure success
  • Contrast how impact investors are the same or different than financial investors
  • Examine the flow of investment funds from both social impact and financial investors

11:30 am – 12:15 pm

Concurrent Sessions
K-12 Edtech Piloting: Mapping the Path to Successful Implementation

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: Beth Rabbitt, CEO of the Learning Accelerator

PanelistsMary Driscoll, Instructional Superintendent, Boston Public SchoolsAndy Marcinek, Chief Information Officer, Worcester Academy & Former Chief Open Education Advisor, US Department of Education; Julie Baudreau, Director of Digital Learning, Westford Public Schools 

How do schools decide which academic challenges to apply technology to? How do they identify which edtech products are suitable for a particular learning environment? There are so many important considerations: is the product is research-based, will it work in your context, is it implementable with your technology infrastructure, how much training will be required, will your students take to it, and whether you can be confident that it will create better student outcomes.

During this session, participants will:

  • Explore how schools are structuring pilot programs to address these issues
  • Identify what approaches are working in schools – from both  an academic and industry perspective
  • Examine practices and protocols that schools are adopting for future piloting
Inside Sales Secrets

Room: 309

Moderator: Rita Ferrandino, Founder, ARC Capital

Panelists: Alex Rappaport, Co-founder & CEO, FlocabularyTeddy Rice, President and Co-Founder, Ellevation

Many edtech companies develop and sell edtech products or services with an average sale of less than $20,000. A sales strategy built on inside sales, may be the most economically effective. In a “relationship business,” does inside sales work for new business as well as renewals? What types of candidates can be effective, and how should they be trained and managed? Software as a Service (SAAS) metrics can be invaluable to compare your progress to best-in-class organizations.

In this session, participants will:

  • Identify what are the critical SAAS metrics that will help to build a successful business
  • Outline how to structure an inside sales effort
  • Examine the variety of  successful candidate profiles for inside sales roles
Scaling Up Internships and Experiential Learning Opportunities in Higher Ed

Room: 301

Moderator: Jake Murray, Faculty Director for Professional Education, Boston University School of Education

Panelists: Eric Schwarz, Co-Founder & CEO, College for Social Innovation; Dana Stephenson, Co-Founder & Chief Connecting Officer, Riipen; Chris Mallett, VP of Online Experiential Learning, Northeastern University

Many institutions wish to offer more internships and experiential learning opportunities to students.  Managing the creation of opportunities and monitoring effectiveness – if they are for credit – is a challenge.  

In this session, participants will:

  • Discuss the development of experiential learning in higher ed
  • Identify how alumni networks are used
  • Explore CUREs – Course-based undergraduate research experiences
  • Examine ways to create and manage local partnerships
Learning Innovation Showcase

Room 312 

The Learning Innovation Showcase uniquely presents the voices of learners and enables diverse groups – educators, entrepreneurs, investors, and policy makers – to see a wide range of edtech tools applied in real learning environments. Our inspiring showcase is an opportunity to learn about innovative programming that personalizes learning for students of all ages through access to effective, cutting-edge edtech.

Twenty teachers and student teams have stepped forward to showcase emerging models of teaching and learning in Secondary Ed (6th – 12th grade), Higher Ed, and learning programs outside of school.

Note: At last year’s Across Boundaries conference, the “Classroom of the Future” drew hundreds of interested participants. This year, we have renamed the showcase the “Learning Innovations Showcase” in order to attract out of school and post secondary learning innovations. 2016 Classroom of the Future

The Future of Food, Andover High School – Andover, MA
Lead Educator: Shelagh St. Laurent

The AHS Future of Food Computer is a small scale hydroponic garden (soil-less garden = that’s the “food” part) and is maintained by a complex series of computers and sensors (= the “computer” part). The Food Computer represents the next evolution in food production and hydroponics. The system is an enclosed hydroponic system that monitors and controls a short list of variables – like temperature, ph, light, CO, etc. – to drastically increases yield and reduce growing time. The Food Computer uses off-the-shelf, affordable tech tools to create an enhanced growing environment to maximize fresh, local, and healthy food options for people any where in the world, any time of year. Learn more: Augmented Reality Sandbox Video

The Anatomy of the Wired Classroom, Beaver Country Day School – Chestnut Hill, MA
Lead Educator: Yolanda Wilcox González

What does it mean to be a wired classroom? Now into our eighth year of practicing hardwired innovation in a 1:1 environment, we have learned a few things and are excited to share our insights. Our goal is to dissect wired classroom experiences and lay on display good daily rituals, collaborative projects, and final products. In doing so, we will be highlighting practical tools that allow teachers and students to become designers, tips for classroom teachers wherever they may land on the technological spectrum, and concrete examples of how to make technology work for you, for the students, and for the educational process. Learn more: Student’s Timeline Project on Sutori, Teacher’s Assignment Presented on Sutori, Literary Devices Presented on Padlet

In the Middle of Design Thinking, Blake Middle School – Medfield, MA
Lead Educator: Diane Horvath

In the Middle of Design Thinking showcases the quick impact design thinking has already made at Blake Middle School since it’s introduction to the faculty this fall. Teachers are combining the power of 1:1 iPad technologies and Design Thinking to reframe student learning across many content areas. Design Thinking has become the glue or guiding principle for teachers to engage students to collaborate in solving a design challenge. Where, the iPad has been invaluable in offering a variety of mobile tools for students. It provides ways for students to capture and record their process, to collaborate and share their ideas and gain feedback, or to develop a video-pitch of their solution. This combination has resulted in moving towards more student-centered, open-ended learning to explore and possibly solve real-world, authentic problems . This showcase will give you a look into a couple of examples of how design thinking is incorporated into the Makerspace, Ancient Greek History (7Gr Social Studies), and Genius Hour of 8th Grade Science and how you can bring the power of DT to your school too.

Math Music Videos, Chelmsford Public Schools – Chelmsford, MA
Lead Educator: Matthew Beyranevand

One way to increase students’ interest and engagement in mathematics is to create music videos with them. Using popular music as a foundation, students and teachers work collaboratively to create songs to teach concepts as well as inspire kids to love math. As featured on WCVB Chronicle and WBZ Eye on Education, creator Dr. Matthew Beyranevand and 7th grade students will share about the importance of girls taking STEM courses as well as the benefits of having a growth mindset. Learn more: Math with Matthew

Exploring the Student Experience in Online, Competency-Based Higher Ed, College for America at Southern New Hampshire University – Manchester, NH
Lead Educator: Jake DeSchuiteneer

College for America (CfA) at Southern New Hampshire University is a regionally accredited, nonprofit university dedicated to developing low-cost, online, competency-based degrees specifically for its diverse population of working adults. The student experience at CfA is unique—students work at a flexible pace to complete workplace-relevant projects in an online format in order to demonstrate mastery of the competencies in their degree program. Rather than attending courses taught by faculty members, students engage independently with the projects and are well supported by Learning Coaches (who guide students through the learning process) and Reviewers (who review and provide detailed feedback on all project work). This Learning Innovation Showcase, which will be presented by a CfA student and two of CfA’s Curriculum and Assessment Developers (CADs), will demonstrate the online learning experience we have created for all students in our degree programs, including the student-facing dashboard, the project-based curriculum model and how we use technology to facilitate project submission, feedback and communication with Coaches and Reviewers.

The Mathematics Classroom of the Future, Duxbury High School – Duxbury, MA
Lead Educator: Stephanie Iacadoro

We will be showcasing the integration of Project Based Learning in a 1:1 Learning Environment in the Mathematics Curriculum. Projects will include technology, writing, and student choice and include the work of a wide range of courses including College Prep, Honors, and AP courses. In our curriculum, performance assessments that are supported through technology are infused into our curriculum vertically and thus sustainable.

VR – An Educational Game Changer
Hamilton Wenham Regional High School / Miles River Middle School – South Hamilton, MA
Lead Educator: Johanna Wilson

Have you ever wished you could take your students to places beyond the classroom or farther away than a school-day field trip would allow? Maybe to the top of Mt. Everest or perhaps, on an underwater adventure? Using virtual reality in the classroom allows teachers to make real connections that enhance and enrich the content. For students, virtual reality provides a learning experience previously unimaginable. Learn how one school district is using virtual reality in new and unique ways to engage students and break down the classroom walls.

Igniting the Maker Mindset, John F Kennedy School – Somerville, MA
Lead Educator: Lindsey Tosches

The Maker Mindset is alive and well at the John F. Kennedy School! By incorporating the maker-way-of-knowing into our standards based science curriculum, students have the opportunity to expand and apply their knowledge in unique, hands-on ways. Modeling problem solving using the engineering and design process provides the framework for students to test, evaluate, and redesign all aspects of their work. Some of our past projects have included 3D design in TinkerCad, 3D printing, and Stop Motion Animation, as well as other hands-on learning experiences. Our showcase will demonstrate that making does not have to be done separately from science curriculum; making can be a meaningful (and FUN) extension of learning that engages all students through a variety of technologies! Learn More: Kennedy School Makerspace, Grade5STEAM 2016 website, Kennedy Makerspace Instagram

Using Innovative Multimedia Engineering Curriculum in Middle School STEM, Mohawk Trail Regional Middle School -Shelburne Falls, MA
Lead Educator: Lauren Binger

Seventh-graders in Lauren Binger’s STEM classes at Mohawk Trail Regional School (MA) used Through My Window (TMW), an NSF-funded engineering curriculum created by Smith College and Springfield Technical Community College. TMW is a multimedia learning environment designed using cutting-edge learning theory. The curriculum includes three components: a young adult novel called Talk to Me–available as an e-reader, audiobook, and paperback; interactive online learning modules, and offline enrichment activities. Engineering topics such as artificial intelligence and the design cycle are featured. Ms. Binger, several of her students, and TMW developers will share results and experiences.

Greengineering, Newton North High School – Newton, MA
Lead Educator: Adam Peloquin

Greengineering is a design engineering course at Newton North High School in which students are challenged to think outside the box. The Greengineering curriculum offers students opportunities to develop solutions for today and tomorrow that will enable the human species to live in harmony with the planet. From soap to skateboards, students become environmental advocates who follow their passions to create innovative products that offer environmental solutions. With the help of the design process students work through complex projects that teach them about marketing, sales, chemistry, economics, biology, and mechanics. Learn More: Greengineering Website

Mission to Mars, North Reading Middle School – North Reading, MA
Lead Educator: Kathleen Dasho

In this session participants will learn about how students in our after school robot club used STEM concepts to build and program a Mission to Mars simulation using LEGO EV3 robots. They demonstrated their enthusiasm and determination in hands-on problem solving completing the assorted challenges with the robots in activities that promote creative problem-solving, communication and teamwork skills. Students creatively adapted and applied programming and problem-solving skills to make the robots solve challenges related to space exploration, such as programming robots to gather rocks on Mars, rescue stranded astronauts, retrieve a Mars rover, launch a satellite and a communications station. Students worked in groups to solve these problems, and explored the necessary strategies to complete the challenges. The showcase will show the robots in action, as well as a video in the background showing the challenges as if you were on Mars watching this take place. Using laptops with the EV3 software, students programmed, tested robots and completed the challenges. Key goals were having robots autonomously carry out and complete each challenge successfully, as well as working collaboratively with a partner to complete the task. Learn More: Mission to Mars Video

Spark your Teaching with Digital Tools, Northeastern University – Boston, MA
Lead Educator: Nina Araújo

Many factors can play a role in how students engage with various types of information, such as depth and breadth of new content, its organization, and visual design of materials as well as media elements. This is not a one-stop shop environment. It has become crucial for pre-service students in the education department at Northeastern University to access information via multiple entry points to learning. The use of engaging and innovative digital tools provide experiences that promote sustained student engagement, in and out of the classroom, in the cloud, or in their hands through mobile devices. The integration helps students solve problems from a variety of different angles using different technology. This showcase will illustrate to participants what teaching and learning look like within an innovative and integrated digital environment. The key goal of this showcase is to promote student engagement and sustain it over time as a model for future students in k-12 schools. Learn More: Mobile App Assignment

Reflective Learning Mindset: Developing Self-Directed Learners in STEM, St. Mark’s School -Southborough, MA
Lead Educator: Kimberley Berndt

For students to become life-long learners they need to develop the habits of mind requisite for being a reflective learner. This presentation will share the story of how students in a lab-based Biotechnology course experienced the power of personalized learning as they practiced habits and developed skills necessary to truly “own” their learning. A gradual release of responsibility and deliberate scaffolding enabled learners to develop self-efficacy in the lab, learn deeply about science, creatively communicate their learning, and follow their own curiosities.

STEAM Splash, Stormgears FRC – Devens, MA
Lead Educator: William Kazman

STEAM Splash was created by a high-school robotics team in 2014. We came together after being inspired by the 2014 FLL World Championships. It was a life-changing experience for us, but we realized that not everyone has this opportunity. There are many barriers to becoming involved with FIRST and enjoying STEAM, such as money and time commitment from adults. With STEAM Splash Jr. FLL In-a-Box, we greatly lower the barriers of getting children from ages 6-10 involved with team-based showcases that celebrate STEAM education and progress. STEAM Splash Jr. FLL In-a-Box reformats the Jr. FLL season into eight 60-minute activity sessions and is complemented by our STEAM Splash Showcase. The STEAM Splash Showcase is an online platform which contains our entire curriculum as a downloadable PDF. Along with this it allows the kids to display their work and interact with high-school mentors to continue to inspire them.Already we have reached 10,000 kids through over 10 local events and 2 events overseas. We want to spread our passion to the next generation of science and technology leaders using STEAM Splash. Learn More: Stormgears Website

Personalized Learning in Math: Using Technology to Design Custom Math Curricula for Each Student, TechBoston Academy – Boston, MA
Lead Educator: Alia Verner

In our efforts to continue offering our community a world class education that prepares students for success in college, TechBoston Academy added an innovative personalized learning model called Teach to One: Math. Teach to One: Math helps our teachers tailor instruction to the unique learning needs of each scholar at TBA. Each day students receive a customized schedule that indicates what mathematics skill they are ready to learn, the best way for them to learn it, and with which teacher and peers they will work with that day. In Teach to One, students explore math with teachers, collaborating with other scholars on projects, and working with high quality computer software. By meeting each child where they are, we expect our scholars to deepen their understanding and discover the beauty and power of mathematics. Learn More: Teach to One, Teach to One in the Boston Globe, Teach to One on BNN News

Creating Smart Phone Cases Using 3D Printer Technology, Whitman-Hanson Regional High School – Whitman, MA
Lead Educator: Julie Giglia

Students worked in teams of two to complete the design and development of the smartphone case project using 3D printer technology. Students learned and applied the steps in the design process. Students created a project plan that outlined the steps needed from inception to the final cell phone prototype design. It was my job to ensure collaboration with students on the design solution ensuring all steps in the design process are well thought out and completed. Students would have to research target customers’ needs to determine attributes cell phone users want complete 2D and 3D sketches of the prototype and use CAD software called Sketchup. They drew the right dimensional designs to ensure the design prototypes measurements were precise. Teams participated in the design of the cell phone case cover using the CAD software and 3D print final physical cell phone case prototype. This was a learning curve for my students. Often, we had to create many prototypes because the cell phone case ergonomically did not fit the physical cell phone. Students would get frustrated if the case did not fit with their first prototype, it was a learning curve for all involved. Overall, this project enabled my students to learn 3D printer technology. Learn More: 3D Design Challenge Video

Many Stories, One Project: 1:1 Learning and the Multi-Genre Research Project, Wilson Middle School – Natick, MA
Lead Educator: Eric Fries

What are you passionate about? What would you study if you had the choice? Every spring, 8th graders in Natick Public Schools create a “Multi-Genre Research Project” encompassing multiple weeks of research and the creation of several small projects to create a cohesive presentation on a topic of their choice. This process, however, is one they work towards throughout the year through a 1:1 laptop initiative and a variety of project-based learning experiences in many of their classes. In this showcase, 8th grade students will present examples of projects in core content areas that display the sort of individualized learning that builds towards this research project. In addition, a 9th grade student will explain and present the process of choosing a topic they’re passionate about, researching it and creating and end-of-year Multi-Genre Research project on it. Exemplar work from these and other students will be displayed. These projects will show how a 1:1 blended learning environment can foster individualized learning and encourage the sort of inquiry and technical skills that lead to an end-of-Middle School capstone project. Learn More: Wilson Middle School

A Unified K-12 Tech Platform

Room: 303

Moderator: Seth Reynolds, Managing Director, Parthenon-EY

Panelists:
 Oliver Wreford, VP Strategy and Marketing, PowerSchool; Elizabeth Combs, Managing Director, Frontline Research and Learning Institute

PowerSchool is the Student Information Systems (SIS) for more than 30% of US K-12 students. They are acquiring add-on’s – SRB Education Solutions, Haiku, InfoSnap, TieNET – to create a full software suite for schools. Google for Education is the fastest growing software suite in edtech. Jenzabar and Sunguard did the same in higher ed. Is this the solution for creating a unified software solution for schools or will customers demand “best of breed?”

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore what’s the state of the art in software suites, who’s building them, and whether more are in development
  • Consider the costs of schools and colleges integrating their various software solutions
  • Examine the drivers motivating customers in purchasing suites
  • Assess the future for more integrated offerings
Research: The Evidence Base and How to Use It

Room: 310

Moderator: Aubrey Francisco, Director of Research, Digital Promise

Panelists: Katrina Stevens, Deputy Director of the Office of Educational Technology, US Department of Education; Bi Vuong, Director of Proving Ground, Harvard Graduate School of Education; Steve Newton, Research Director, LearnLaunch Institute

Educators are eager for a stronger evidence base on the efficacy of personalized learning products. This panel will address the state of research in the area of personalized learning, both from the perspective of adopting schools and creators looking at how to structure research.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine research resources which are currently available
  • Explore piloting methodologies which can be used in schools
  • Review current findings of piloting research organizations

12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Lunch and Expo

More Information TBA

1:15 pm – 2:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions
Special Populations and Edtech

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: Karen Janowski, Assistive and Educational Technology Consultant, Ed-Tech Solutions & Simmons College

Panelists: Ryan Knight, Director of Strategy and Evaluation, UP Education Network; Kathleen Colburn, Product Manager, TextHelp; Sara Davila, Director of English Language Learner Programs and Family & Community Outreach, Somerville Public Schools

Special education populations have been using assistive technology for some time, but now a larger population of students are using digital technologies as part of their  learning. Educators and leaders are increasingly using edtech for interventions for many groups of students. Multi-tiered systems of support, RTI (Response to Intervention) and ELL (English Language Learners) focused interventions  are increasingly incorporating edtech.

Educators and leaders are increasingly using technology interventions to address the unique learning needs of diverse learners. Technology is incorporated into methods used for students with special needs as well as for multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS), and Response to Intervention, RTI. In addition, new methods are designed to work with English Language Learners (ELL). Ubiquitous educational, adaptive and assistive technologies provide exciting novel solutions and afford new opportunities for data-driven decision making. This panel discussion will explore the changing role of expanded technology use when working with special populations.

 

During this session, participants will:

  • Examine research on the use of edtech products for intervention with special populations
  • Review what developers are saying about using their products to achieve peak results, and what this means for both in-class and pull-out settings
  • Explore with practitioners how the new generation of educational technology is expanding the role of edtech in our classrooms.
Growing from an Edtech Startup into a Global Edtech Company

Room: 312

Moderator: Monica Brady-Myerov, CEO, Listenwise

Panelists: Brita Nordin, VP of Content Development, Pearson; Norihisa Wada, Senior Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer, Edulab, Dan Tu-Hoa, SVP North America, Mathspace 

When entrepreneurs aspire to grow globally, they need to know how to expand their sales and distribution approach. App stores project business to consumer products globally, but partnerships might be best for enterprise selling to districts or colleges.

In this session, participants will:

  • Hear from successful entrepreneurs on the journey of going global
  • Explore how entrepreneurs are using the global app stores
  • Identify how entrepreneurs have engaged global partners
  • Examine routes available to those focussed on enterprise selling

 

Big Data at Community Colleges and Universities: Supporting Student Success and Higher Completion Rates

Room: 301

Moderator: Vijay Kumar, Associate Dean and Senior Strategic Advisor for Digital Learning, MIT

Panelists: 
Gerardo DeLos Santos, Senior Fellow,  Civitas LearningMichael Harris, Assistant Professor, Bunker Hill Community College; Eileen Smith, VP of Marketing & Communications, Jenzabar

Community colleges, colleges and universities are looking for ways to support students completing degrees. Leaders would like students to be able to support themselves via online systems, while still providing direct human advising and intervention resources for the students who most need these services. The data they need to construct intervention points is often in many systems.

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore how colleges can use big data to support student success
  • Examine what steps college leaders are taking to make use of the data
  • Evaluate how college software providers are using big data
  • Outline steps to move your higher ed institution forward
Interoperability - The Next Frontier

Room: 310

Panelists: Stephen Laster, Chief Digital Officer, McGraw HillErin Mote,  Executive Director, InnovateEduMike Baur, Program Officer,  Michael and Susan Dell Foundation

For personalized learning to reach its potential, students and teachers must be able to rapidly enter their digital learning environments, organize their work, readily access learning material at the right level, and interpret results data from multiple sources of software. Today this is often a complex, mostly manual task. This session will look at how schools and districts are likely to evolve to get to this vision.

In this session, participants will:

  • Identify the different information technology systems and software applications are communicating, exchanging information, and being used
  • Address what the most important challenges to interoperability are from the buyer’s perspective
  • Examine on the most relevant edtech standards
  • Explore concrete steps which buyers and providers can make to enable interoperability  
Trends in Company Continuing Ed and Talent Development

Room: 309

Panelists: David Blake, CEO, Degreed; Jonathan Finklestein, Founder & CEO, Credly; Furqan Nazeeri, Partner, Extension Engine

According to Deloitte, 8 out of every 10 senior executives indicate that learning is a critical issue for their company and their employees. Additionally, today’s employee expects dynamic and self-directed learning opportunities from their employer. Technology has been supercharging corporate education.

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore how companies are moving to curate a learning experience for employees
  • Examine how companies are moving from periodic programs to self-directed solutions, owned by individual employees
  • Address the struggle that a company may have when trying to understand and articulate the learning needs of employees
Trends in Simulations

Room: 308

Moderator: Bill Triant, VP Strategic Partnerships and Investments, Pearson

Panelists: Mark Atkinson, CEO, Mursion; David Martz, VP Business Development, Authess; Kristine Erwin, Biology & Chemistry Teacher, St. John’s Prep

Simulations have long been used by air pilots and the military to train for complex situations. In the past, simulations were only available and affordable for the most life-saving applications. Today, according to Simba Research, simulations are one of the hottest areas of growth in edtech. This could mean that change is in the air and that simulation tools with be available soon to more learners and less cost. Or, not.

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore what the leaders of training simulation companies are seeing in terms of change and trends
  • See brief demonstrations of simulations for education and training
  • Address the value of simulations for learning and for performance assessment
  • Examine the cost parameters for creating or using simulations
  • Identify what areas are most ripe for adopting simulations

2:15 pm – 3:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions
Learning without Boundaries

Room: 312

Moderator: Travis McCready, President and CEO,  Massachusetts Life Sciences Center

Panelists: Josh Schachter, Founder and Director, CommunityShareAndrew Frishman, Co-Executive Director, Big Picture LearningChris Smith, President & Executive Director, Boston After School and Beyond 

Learning can take take place anywhere. Libraries are now offering makerspaces, museums are firing  the imagination with special exhibits, social enterprises are supporting extended learning opportunities and, companies are providing authentic projects for students. MOOCs and online opportunities abound. The desire to engage students has never been greater among educators and parents.

During this session, participants will:

  • Outline how teachers and school leaders are using makerspaces, museums, social enterprises and companies as partners beyond the class day
  • Explore how this work is coordinated by schools and community organizations
  • Examine how learning is assessed when not within traditional models
  • Dissect what actions stakeholders must take to expand opportunities for students
Edtech and the International Student Opportunity

Room: 308

Moderator: Willis Wang, Vice President and Associate Provost for Global Programs and Deputy General Counsel, Boston University

Panelists: Jackson Boyar, Co-founder & CEO, Shearwater; Mohannad Arbaji, Founder & CEO, ChalkTalk; Sharon Butler, VP of Global Sales, Flywire

Colleges and universities are seeking international students to grow campus global connections and to  augment their revenue streams. Many successful ed companies have been founded to support this strategy, including filling international students needs for banking, telecommunications, and English Language Learning. Colleges also sought help identifying students.

In this session, participants will:

  • Identify what key needs now exist in this field
  • Examine how entrepreneurs have approached building businesses in this area
  • Explore the key concerns of college as they grow international student populations
Personalizing the System, Not Just the Classroom

Room: 310

Moderator: Anthony Kim, CEO, Ed Elements

Speakers: Peter Sanchioni, Superintendent, Natick Public Schools; Eric Conti, Superintendent, Burlington Public Schools; Mary Skipper, Superintendent, Somerville Public Schools

More districts are looking to personalize education for their students. Leaders are seeking to learn the best approaches used by their peers. They want to understand how to get started, how to build support, and how to find funds.

In this session, participants will:

  • Examine how superintendents get personalized learning initiatives kicked-off in their district
  • Outline how they built support from teachers, parents and school committees
  • Identify the funding strategies they adopted
  • Explore the cultural changes that need to occur
Tech Giants and the Next Gen Classroom

Room: 302-306 (Ballroom)

Moderator: John Kim, Senior Lecturer of General Management, Harvard Business School

Panelists: Rob Rubin, Director of Microsoft Professional Degree, Microsoft; Karen Greenleaf, Content Lead, Google for Education, Peter Scott, Strategic Partnerships, Amazon Education

The major platform providers – Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon – are all active in education. They offer key operating systems and hardware, directory systems, productivity and collaboration software, and ecommerce platforms. Their offerings in education specific software are increasingly rich: spanning learning management systems and content management systems. How are platform providers supporting entrepreneurs, content creators, and tool providers? How does free vs. paid content fit into their ecosystems? What are intersection points for commercial and non-profit education companies? Can deep integration support student learning?

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore evolutionary trends from educational software platforms and leading tech companies
  • Address platform evolution from device management to LMS and workflow management
  • Identify how the platform providers attract content
  • Examine what acquisitions have been made by tech giants and explore their future direction
Effective Integration of Technology in Early Education

Room: 301

Moderator: Angela Nelson, President, Stages Learning Materials

Panelists
Meghan McGinley Crowe, Executive Director, Little Sprouts; Jennifer Reed, Teacher Librarian, Mason Rice School

Children are using various technologies from a very young age. This year the American Academy of Pediatrics issued new guidelines for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. “What’s most important is that parents be their child’s ‘media mentor.’ That means teaching them how to use interactive media as a tool to create, connect and learn,” says the report.

How do the APA report, and the current trends in EdTech development, shape the creation of new early education products? What are the different categories of products which touch early childhood education? How are educational products used in informal learning both at home and school? Join us to discuss the current and future landscape of EdTech in Early Childhood Education.

In this session, participants will:

  • Review the landscape of early childhood apps, from PBS to ABC Mouse to YouTube and beyond
  • Identify the areas of greatest growth potential
  • Understand if some apps might provide opportunity for underserved children to become more “ready for school”
When Will Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality be Ready for Education?

Room: 309

Panelists: Arthur Baraf, Principal, The Met High School; Jeff Jacobson, CEO, EnterpriseVR; Felipe Sommers, CEO, NearPod

Pokemon Go burst onto the scene this past summer and gave many a taste of augmented reality. How do leading thinkers believe augmented and virtual reality will be applied in education? Is this the cutting edge of new ways to engage students….or is it too far off to pay attention to?

In this session, participants will:

  • Hear from visionaries on their views on the potential of virtual and augmented reality
  • Explore what researchers who are more reserved in their forecasts are saying
  • Examine entrepreneurial challenges of working at the cutting edge of tech

3:15 pm – 4:00 pm

Keynote - Personalizing Higher Ed

Northeastern University is widely acknowledged as a leader in experiential learning, and in personalizing  pathways to learning and careers. In this session, President Joseph Aoun will review the key strategies, resources and culture that have enabled Northeastern to innovate. Aoun will share his view on how higher ed will change in the next 3-5 years  as well as make recommendations to higher ed leaders as to key capabilities that higher ed institutions need to address these changes. Competency-based ed, “unbundling”, micro-credentials, internships and more will be touched on.

President_Aoun_0339 copyJoseph E. Aoun, a leader in higher education policy and an internationally renowned scholar in linguistics, is the seventh President of Northeastern University.

A respected voice on the value of global and experiential education, President Aoun has enhanced Northeastern’s signature co-op program with opportunities around the world and additional flexibility. Students have worked, studied, and conducted research in 131 countries, on all seven continents.

President Aoun has strategically aligned the University’s research enterprise with three global imperatives—health, security, and sustainability.  Northeastern is home to seven federally recognized research centers and institutes, including  the  Center for Awareness and Localization of Explosives-Related Threats, the Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, the Center for Translational Cancer Nanomedicine, the Gordon Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems, and the Institute for Information Assurance.  Northeastern’s faculty focus on interdisciplinary research, entrepreneurship, and on transforming research into commercial solutions that address the world’s most pressing problems.

Northeastern’s excellence in education, research, and urban and global engagement is attracting highly-talented applicants from throughout the U.S. and around the world.  This year, it received more than 54,000 applications for freshman admission— the highest in the University’s history.  During Aoun’s presidency, Northeastern has also established a network of regional campuses and has amassed one of the largest libraries of online and hybrid professional masters programs of any university in the U.S.

President Aoun came to Northeastern from the University of Southern California’s College of Letters, Arts & Sciences where he was the inaugural holder of the Anna H. Bing Dean’s Chair. He received his Ph.D. in linguistics and philosophy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and advanced degrees from the University of Paris (France) VIII and Saint Joseph University (Beirut, Lebanon).

President Aoun has published seven books and written more than 40 articles. In 2006 he was named a Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Academiques (Knight of the Order of the Academic Palms) by the French government.  In 2011, he received the Robert A. Muh Award from MIT’s School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the immediate past Chair of the American Council on Education (ACE). In 2013, Northeastern University President Joseph E. Aoun was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). 

4:00pm – 6:00 pm

Closing Reception

Join us at the Hynes Convention Center for a post- conference reception from 4:00pm-6:00pm.